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of antigovernment protesters have renewed their marches in cairo and other cities. they've there have been a number of clashes with security forces who have been firing tear gas and water canners. but after more than a week of unrest, president morsi has issued a statement saying those behind the violence will be held politically accountability -- accountable. >> flashes on the doorstep of the presidential palace. the fires from the cocktails thrown, a message to muhammad morsi. the people feel betrayed. the revolution was supposed to turn egypt into a country where everyone prospered. and where there was justice. for these people who gathered earlier in their new regular friday rituals, reform is coming far too slowly. >> we're back to another demonstration in tahrir square. of course piece people feel passionately about wanting to change things. there are many, many egyptians who feel demonstrations like this are counterproductive and need to stop. ahmed is one of those who feel that after so many decades of dictatorship, the new president needs more time to fix things. >> right nouts not the rig
in alabama entering its fourth day. >>> mayor of new york city from 1978 until 1989 ed koch has died. >>> i did not feel comfortable taking a risk. it was about the president and the inauguration. ♪ the brave ♪ any questions? >>> monthly jobs numbers, the unemployment rate is now 7.9% 157,000 jobs were added. >>> three people are dead in a massive traffic pile-up. meanwhile ten people were injured in a pile-up west of indianapolis. >>> all that -- >> we'd like to -- >> are you sloppy? >> yeah. >> are you -- >> this is horrible. why did i even rush here? >> oh, shut up, dave. >>> he's from nebraska he's a war hero. >> he's from nebraska that's a qualification? >> all that matters. >> new orleans hosts a big party. >> on "cbs this morning." >> some say their favorite part of the super bowl game is the commercials. >> ooh that really targets their key demographic. 14-year-old boys making $500,000 a year. captioning funded by cbs >>> welcome to "cbs this morning" from super bowl park at jackson square new orleans. we want to get right to some breaking news from ankara tu
on the boeing 737. >>> ed koch died. he served three terms and rescued the city from near financial ruins. gained a national reputation for his out spoken style and trademark question, how am i doing. koch died of congestive heart failure. he was 88 years old. charlie, you knew him well. >> i did. he was a true new yorker, a man who loved his city. until i saw him a few months ago, a man of the city and an incredible mayor. >> a documentary coming up soon. >>> and now white house officials tell cbs's major garrett they're disappointed at yesterday's confirmation hearing but they believe the former nebraska senator will be confirmed if only by a slim margin. one of the most damages remarks came from john mccain over the iraq troop surge. >> would you please answer the question. were you correct or incorrect when you said the surge would be the most dangerous foreign policy blunder in this country since vietnam. were you correct or incorrect? yes or no? >> my reference to -- >> are you answering the question, senator hagel? the question is were you right or wrong? that's a pretty straightfo
have renewed their marches in cairo and other cities. they've there have been a number of clashes with security forces who have been firing tear gas and water canners. but after more than a week of unrest, president morsi has issued a statement saying those behind the violence will be held politically accountability -- accountable. >> flashes on the doorstep of the presidential palace. the fires from the cocktails thrown, a message to muhammad morsi. the people feel betrayed. the revolution was supposed to turn egypt into a country where everyone prospered. and where there was justice. for these people who gathered earlier in their new regular friday rituals, reform is coming far too slowly. >> we're back to another demonstration in tahrir square. of course piece people feel passionately about wanting to change things. there are many, many egyptians who feel demonstrations like this are counterproductive and need to stop. ahmed is one of those who feel that after so many decades of dictatorship, the new president needs more time to fix things.
wanted to be in the video but the most intimidating players were chosen. live from daly city, tara moriarty, ktvu channel 2 news. >> thank you. >>> our live team coverage of the 49ers and the super bowl continues in new orleans with joe fonzi. joe, you've been talking to one of the greatest nfl players of all times. good morning. >> reporter: good morning. one of the greatest landmarks is this hotel. a man had a young brier who was homesick. so he had this made for you and when she looked out door, she could see rows of corn from iowa. 23 years ago, one of the heroes of the super bowl was jerry rice. we caught up with him yesterday. it won't surprise you to learn that that game was one of his best memories of new orleans. >> 55-10 against the denver broncos. i will never forget it. that was my second super bowl and i was -- i think i was more relaxed and -- and i had a chance to enjoy the experience. sometimes you get caught up and you have blinders on. and you don't see everything happening around you. you are able to take control of the football game. it was a super bowl. >> repo
, where a truck packed with fireworks exploded. in mexico city, 25 people have been killed in an explosion at the state oil company. rescuers are trying to help the many that were trapped. can australian do enough to stop the united nations from stripping the great barrier reef of its world heritage status? also, looking at what's happening in business news. and jobs in the usa. >> the american economy is shrinking. employment, hoping for 160,000 new jobs to have been created. we will get the manufacturing reports later today as well. >> its 12 noon in london, 7:00 a.m. in washington, 2:00 in the afternoon in turkey. if we start with breaking news. there's been an explosion in front of the u.s. embassy in turkey and one person has been killed. there's no indication as to what caused the explosion in a neighborhood that's home to a number of foreign missions. let's get the latest from our correspondent outside the u.s. embassy. tell us what you know. >> one person killed. i have also seen reports saying possibly and two dead. it is impossible for me to get official confirmation. the place i
and -- cities visited by local custom vehicles go to c-span.org / local content. >> you're watching book tv on c-span2. here is our prime-time lineup for tonight. visit c-span.org for more on this weekend's television schedule. >> international financial diplomat william rhodes talks about the current economic and financial challenges facing the economies of europe, japan, china, and south korea. next on book tv. this is a little over an hour. [applause] >> okay. first of all, it is great to be back. we enjoyed our relationship that way. tokyo has been the headquarters of our asia-pacific operations for 25 years now. we enjoy a terrific relationship and a lot of different ways. one of my colleagues who is with me, doug peterson who just joined us from the city, and he is setting up. we welcome you, doug. dougie is all over the world. as such, he has lived quite a bit of time in japan himself. it's great to be with you tonight as well, doug. let's see. in terms of this whole notion of the book, by the way, a very modest title, banker to the world. when i heard of this, and i am a very close, pers
and never came home. now investigators are trying to figure out who killed this new york city mom. tonight, why d.n.a. could provide the clue that cracks the case. plus, from a record-setting return to a fake field goal attempt, that was one crazy super bowl. and when the power went out, the conspiracy theories lit up. but now we know what really made the superdome go dark. tome. when they tell you that you need your oil changed you got to bring it in. if your tires need to be rotated, you have to get that done as well. jackie, tell me why somebody should bring they're car here to the ford dealership for service instead of any one of those other places out there. they are going to take care of my car because this is where it came from. price is right no problem, they make you feel like you're a family. get a synthetic blend oil change, tire rotation and much more, $29.95 after $10.00 rebate. if you take care of your car your car will take care of you. we replaced people with a machine.r, what? customers didn't like it. so why do banks do it? hello? hello?! if your bank doesn't let you talk
in many cities across europe white people are moving away from ethnically mixed neighborhoods. >> you can get a change that is quite dramatic in the character of an area, and here in london between 2001 and 2011, one-third of the white population has left. >> reporter: enormous demographic changes resulting in profound challenges like the so-called muslim patrols which the communities themselves are now trying to tackle. cnn, london. >>> we have live pictures here, breaking news happening out of cairo. this is actually taking place now. these pictures, these are the streets and they are erupting now, we understand, with water cannons and tear-gas, and this is outside the presidential palace, as the scene there is turning violent. we will have a live report out of cairo after this break. .... director's voice: cut it! ...what...what did i say? gecko? i said gecko? aw... for over 75 year...(laughs. but still trying to keep it contained) director's voice: keep it together. i'm good. i'm good. for over 75...(uncontrollable laughter). what are you doing there? stop making me laugh. vo: geico.
, 1666. okay. . and global news, average home prices in china's 100 biggest cities was 1% in january from december. and it marks the eighth consecutive marketing rise. two other surveys show growth was weak and the economists caution the country could set a tradeback if trade or government weaken. >> we're here for a lot of reasons, but one thing we need to talk about for an advertising, guys, is there anything better to tuz on than the super bowl? >> no. and it's gotten more important. ite become the academy awards of advertising. first of all, viewership is up. about 111 million people will watch it. crisis is up more than 7%. >> more people watch the laugh time or the gain 12347. >> yes. >> i always thought that was when everybody went to the bathroom. >>. >> you go to the kitchen, you get a drink, you do all sorts of things during halftime. >> $3.75 million for a 30-second spot. people have paid over $4 million. price of ads is up 60% over the last decade. they're also sold out almost a half a billion dollars of ads spend for this super bowl. there will be about 78 advertisers. and i
jobs to patrol the city streets. sfwlirchlgt the most difficult moment for the state department under hillary clinton clearly was the loss of four americans, including ambassador chris stevens, at the u.s. mission in benghazi. last september she and president obama preceded over a somber repat yags ceremony at andrews air force base. >> so we will wipe away our tears, stiffen our spines and face the future undaunted. we will do it together. protecting and helping one another. just like sean, tyrone, glen, and chris always did. she pretty much lives in her favorite princess dress. and she's not exactly tidy. even if she gets a stain she'll wear it for a week straight. so i use tide to get out those week old stains and downy to get it fresh and soft. since i'm the one who has to do the laundry. i do what any expert dad would do. i let her play sheriff. i got 20 minutes to life. you are free to go. [ dad ] tide and downy. great on their own, even better together. >>> hillary rodham clinton healthing's commitment to advancing the welfare of women and girls around the world is now entrench
ending of the story we have been following of a new york city woman who went missing in turkey. her body was found over the weekend. authorities just wrapped up an autopsy. police are scouring the area near the ancient city walls where her body was discovered late saturday. family and friends are mourning the loss. >> she is a doll. she works at chiropractor's where i used to go. she is happy. she is a wonderful person. a wonderful mother. i can't imagine how her husband feels right now. gregg: she vanished while vacationing alone. police say she suffered a fatal blow to the head. martha: president obama insisting new revenues will be needed in the future. but he says the tax hikes may not be necessary. here is a piece of the interview he did yesterday. >> there is no doubt we need additional revenue coupled with smart spending reductions in order to bring down our deficit. if you combine those things together we cannot only reduce our deficit but we can invest in education and research and development that will help us grow. martha: what do you think about that at home and what does kar
political instincts above all. he was new yorker, former new york city mayor ed koch died early this morning of congestive heart failure. he was 88 years old. after serving in congress, mayor koch was elected to three times in city hall from 1978 to 1989. koch never married and had no children, but as his "new york times" obituary put it, he was survived by new york itself. koch liked to ask people, you know, how am i doing? eugene robinson, what's his legacy? >> well, as a practical matter, he improved the city's finances tremendously. but really what he did was personify the city, in my view, at a time when it could use that sort of larger than life figure. and he kind of -- his ebullience and determination and drive i think gave a boost in and of themselves to a city that was in pretty bad shape. >> michelle, this was a man who was not afraid to infuriate liberals. >> yeah. i think he seemed to delight in it. in some ways he was kind of the prototypical neo conservative, somebody who started on the left, who started out very liberal, and then made his political career being tough on crime
gutierrez is in midland city once again this morning. good morning. >> reporter: good morning. law enforcement official tells nbc news that the fbi somehow managed to get a secret camera inside that bunker and that's how they decided to move in. a dramatic end to a six-day standoff. in alabama monday, a federal hostage team stormed an underground bunker, where this man, 65-year-old jimmy lee dykes, was holding a 5-year-old, known only as ethan, captive. >> very special child. he has been through a lot. he has endured a lot. by the grace of god, you know, he's okay. >> reporter: the two spent 143 hours in the underground shelter, stocked with supplies. law enforcement officials watching closely every minute from the ground and the air, using small, unmanned aircraft. based on sketches from a neighbor who says he was once inside dykes' bunker, we now know the shelter had a hatch and ladder and pvc pipe that, at times was used to communicate with dykes actually ran sideways, 50 yards under ground to his property. authorities were able to get a camera inside the bunker. though they're
york city, ed koch. he will be warmly remembered. president bill clinton will be speaking there at the funeral today. the mayor who famously asked everybody, how am i doing all across the city. he was really beloved by a bipartisan gathering of new yorkers i would say and today he will be remembered at temple emanuel at new york city. that will be quite a service i would imagine there. >> there are so many ed koch stories to go around. the "new york post" the other day answered his famous line with a front page that said, you did great. he was a beloved mayor of new york city. martha: yeah, indeed he was and he is being remembered right now. more on that later. gregg, thank you for being with us today. >> my pleasure. martha: we'll see you back here tomorrow and "happening now" starts right now. jenna: right now we have brand new stories and breaking news. >> the little boy at the center of the hostage drama, tense negotiations to get him free and the high-tech surveillance equipment now helping investigators. >>> also the troop drawdown in afghanistan. new reaction from i
sixth day. cnn's martin savidge is in midland city for us. martin, the bus driver is being called a hero. what are people saying about him tonight? >> reporter: well, they are saying every kind of word that means hero when they refer to charles poland. that's exactly what he's being considered by just about everybody in this community because of what he did, the fact he was driving the school bus and according to witnesses stood up and tried to protect the lives of the 20-some children that were on that bus. and then died as a result of it. i should update you a little bit on the standoff itself. not a major change but there was a news conference originally scheduled, it's been cancelled. not uncommon. it simply means authorities haven't got anything really new to say. very little information coming out because these are very sensitive negotiations that are ongoing. the concern is that perhaps the suspect here may have some way to listen to news media. but then you get this very specific information from time to time from authorities, and they mentioned that tonight cheese its, a snack f
with the city. fema is well represented and we have several defense coordinating officers here over the past couple of days. certainly the california national guard is represented heavily here. obviously they are going to be the first guys to respond to a disaster and they have several interesting roles not only from a state perspective but as they get federalized or with the dual status commander managing federal response and federal authorities of military authorities flowing in. and most significantly, we're represented today with the commander of northern command, general jackoby. as you know, defense report to civil authorities is not a primary mission area for the department of defense. we have codified it in policy over the years and certainly things have advanced since 9/11 and hurricane katrina, but there has been a real gap in detailed preplanning for emergency response, particularly as it works its way down the chain into the tactical forces that would respond, most specifically i think those on active duty. this is an area that we don't tend to pay a lot of attention to and ver
have left dozens dead and prompted president morsi to declare a state of emergency in three cities along the suez canal. all of this in a nation that john kerry in his confirmation hearings declared crucial to our objectives in the region. joining us now from cairo, nbc news foreign correspondent ayman mohadine. >> i apologize, go ahead. >> you go ahead. tell us what's the latest from egypt? >> well, is just going to update us really quickly on the news we're getting about the rise in casualty figures. class slashes ha clashes have been taking place outside the presidential palace. there have been fatalities. the riot police have been firing tear gas to keep the protesters pushed further back. we also under the profetesters have been fired molotov cocktails. it is a very chaotic situation that is still developing at this hour. >> ayman, our relationship with egypt obviously very critical. one of the things that has been our point of leverage is the aid that we provide to the military, but these clashes, as you mentioned, are with the police forces. what's happening in the relations
by colleagues is with me, doug peterson, who just joined us from citi, and he is heading up standard & poor's ratings, and we welcome you, doug. and doug has lived with citi all over the world and as such as lived quite a bit of time in japan itself. so it's great to be with you tonight as well, doug. let's see, in terms of this whole notion of the book, you know, by the way, it's a very modest title, banker to the world. [laughter] you know, when i heard of this -- and i'm a very close personal friend of bill's, like everybody in this room is, and so when testifies talking to me about this -- when he was talking to me about this concept of what he wanted to write about, lessons of debt cry cease and all of this, i just knew that it was right in our sweet spot in what we needed to be able to do. so we were able to convince him, and so now i'm not talking to you as his friend, i'm talking to you as his publisher. [laughter] and we had this decision, you know, we were going to do this book, and we kid. and we did. now, the ink wasn't even dry on this book when henry kissinger came out and sai
cities or places that are more neutral to it. it is certainly hard to prejudge the outcome of these talks. the foreign minister at a security conference in munich over the weekend was making positive noises about what could be achieved in the new obama administration, the second term you about it is ultimately the supreme leader who calls the shots. certainly the fact that iran told the u.n. nuclear watchdog last week it was going to be deploying a significant number of second generation centrifuges that can spin uranium three times as fast as ones currently used is not a sign of stepping back, jenna. it is certainly a sign of moving quickly along. there are some experts who think that actually more rigorous, intensive, sustained negotiations at this point will be more useful than sanctions. then there are different opinions at this point about this point of no return. some say it his iran has enough fissile materiel it could make a nuclear warhead. and that would be this summer by many estimates. others are saying that red line point is when iran can do that but do it in a way that is un
later he has a reunion with one of his horses at a big city parade. >>gretchen: and the horse remembers him which is the end of the important relationship there. in the spirit of full disclosure, brian and steve, i have to tell you that some of the ones i really, really liked i didn't really see in entirety. my daughter saw some of them and told me. when i went to the bathroom she said you missed the most fantastic commercial. we were at a party. you get talking and i was like i'm supposed to be watching the commercials. >>steve: did you run the d.v.r. backwards? >>gretchen: no. i was at somebody else's house. that would have been rude. >>steve: we'll go there some of the ones we liked. first, it's hard to beat the rock. the rock's kids needed some milk. >> we're out of milk. >>steve: what does he do? a situation where he goes for milk, but along the way there are all sorts of things that he needs to tend to. he needs to help get the cat out of the tree and stop the bank robbery. >>gretchen: that looks very cute. i missed that one. did you have another one? >>steve: i did. fantastic. th
: where? >> traverse city, michigan. i'll have the website by my end time with with you today. stephanie: i don't know if there's any marco rubio jokes left. >> i think there might be a couple left. it was great. i was doing live coverage with all the folks at current on there, so we timed it with david shuster and cenk, we all had bottles of water to drink from. there was so much focus on his dehydration, she have given a short shrift to his lies. stephanie: that's true. he fell into the orchestra pit at the end. there's nothing at a you're going to remember. >> how do you sweat that much when you're standing in complete darkness. i've seen snuff films with better lighting. this is why you need union lighting guys, marco. i know you don't like the sound of that. stephanie: boehner basically came out and said what i said about the state of the union with all these great ideas clapping politely as if to say none of that's ever going to happen. that's what he said, nah none of that's going to happen. >> it's fun to watch to see where they don't stand up. i try to tell my republican friends
in getting things done? >> well, walter was an internationalist first class. the expanded the city banks in italy over -- is a great friend of japan. used to go to japan regularly, and i think he, along with paul volcker on the public sector side, where major mentors of mind. and so i think it's fair to say, and you've seen this, that walter was the greatest thinker of his age. and that's what citi is going back to i think at this point in time. we have a lot of present citi bankers, former citibank offers who i know will agree with me. but as far as, you, working with walter come easily got me involved in all of this, and john reed later on, were both i think significant world financial leaders. as far as having talked to a lot of people, i think meeting monday look, having dealt with a number of cases, spend our in 1980 with ago castro. he wanted my advice on how to restructure the cuban debt. and i can speak to you about that because we nationalize in cuba, one of the first things we did was nationalize the foreign banks. then he walks on our resource. we're kind of even here. certain
was there is this requirement at the time, gun safety class, which was five hours long, and you could not teach it in the city because it requires an hour at the range so you had to leave the city. there were really no restrictions. it was open ended on who could teach it, where they could teach it. it was all these men teaching it in these homes. it made me feel very unsafe. i couldn't find an instructor. in the end the city council, because of reading all this, exposing all this, the city made it virtually impossible for people to get guns in the city, the city council passed a law this year that took away that requirement, that five-hour class. and a couple other small requirements, but there's still 11 steps to gun ownership in washington which is only down from 17 when i did it. host: emily miller, who is charles sykes and what's his role in the gun-buying process in d.c.? guest: well, charles sykes is the one legal gun dealer in washington, d.c., and he's been doing it for years. he does not buy and sell. he has a very unique role which is transferring the guns, because federal law says you have to have
, it could seriously have leveled the city which brings us to nasa. are they doing enough to prevent a giant space rock from hitting us? do you wonder about that now? it is now the time to strip away funding. here with more on this is terice, managing directorof space.com. first of all, a lot of people wonder if there's a connection between the two events? dpl that was the first question we had, too. the answer right now is no. nasa says that the two -- the asteroids, the one that flew by this afternoon, the big one, they came from completely different directions meaning they are not from the same object, and they say that fairly conclusively. melissa: a coincidence. >> pardon the pun, a cosmic coincidence. amazing it happened in the same day. melissa: makes you feel vulnerable. we watch one, and we get hit from the other side. you say the key to protect ourselves 1 -- is not helmets, but early detection. >> yeah, you can't protect yourself from asteroids if you don't know they are out there. that's something nasa, they have a program in place to look for the big ones, the ones that could de
of this country. and, of course, wolf, on a day like this when there's intense fighting in the city of damascus, that feeling that seems to be moving closer, the conflict is getting worse, it's something weighing more heavily on the minds of the people in damascus. >> fred, you've been in damascus for a few days. give us a sense how close the fighting is getting, right into the heart of the capital. >> well, i'll tell you something, wolf, today was the most intense fighting that we've seen since we got here a couple of days ago and people who have been speaking here from damascus say this is the worst fighting that they've seen since the conflict began more than two years ago. when they woke up, artillery was coming down pretty much the entire time. the past couple of days there's been a shell fired every five, six, seven minutes. today there was a barrage. i made it to a suburb south of damascus. when we made it there, we sort of filmed what was going on. you could just see plumes of smoke over that town. you could clearly see that a lot of very heavy ordinance had been dropped on that place a
, and as you mentioned, i was just in new york city and these huge new york city companies like general electric and bank of america and philips they wanted to become customer companies. >> the reason i mentioned the bernstein thing, he says microsoft's coming along, oracle -- you in the talk i listened to said, oracle, ibm, microsoft, they're all really good at this now. wait a second, they all weren't really good when we first started talking. >> well, you've been right on, jim. and unfortunately, that bernstein analyst you quoted and i think this is what you want me to say. over the last one or two years now, he's been dead wrong. >> thank you. >> he doesn't realize the world has changed, the world has transformed, the world has evolved. we have moved into a new world of computing. who is carrying around a pc? who has windows anymore? this is a new world. we all have computers in our pockets. we're on to facebook, we're on twitter, the -- things are going more dynamic than ever before. and this is an exciting new world, but it's a treacherous world. because for companies, they have t
failure. he was 88 years old. koch led new york city for 12 years, known for saving the city from financial ruin. michael bloomberg saying in a statement the city has lost an icon. a cheerleader, champion, 5,000-word oh bit in the "times" today, words like pugnacious, tenacious, outspoken. david, you know his story pretty well. he really did set the stage for giuliani to change the city. >> yeah, he was the consummate new yorker. of course, living in his apartment not far from here, in greenwich village for so many years. not everybody in the community, but many would say, our mayor. when he came into the office in '78, the city was at or near its nader. i can remember it well at that time, of course. and we did grow a great deal under his mayorality. not without some scandal, but certainly with a great deal of enthusiasm. in many ways he brought the spirit back and made you feel good about being a new yorker. which is not easy to do, when you had lived through the '70s. >> he passes on a day where a new biography, a film biography of him opens. something somebody said is the koch
because it happened very quickly without a single fire shot. we know what happened next. out into the city they went. this is where it gets quite fascinating. once they came out of the airport, somewhere down around here, look at all of the art rarelies that they could have gone to. if you think about it, just driving 30 miles per hour in five minutes they could have been beyond that radius in almost any direction, wolf. it's been an extraordinary story of how they were organized, the whole thing from beginning to end took about 11 minutes and then they were gone without a trace. they found a burned out vehicle that they think is connected to this but they don't know if it was the direction they went or anything else. the bottom line is, the diamonds are gone. if you want a sense of what $50 million in diamonds looks like, take a look at this. this bag has half a million small diamonds in it. if you want to have $50 million worth of diamonds, what you have to have is that many bags full of diamonds like that. so it's an extraordinary robbery but getting rid of it, wolf, will be the real ch
in the 70s, the city almost tore it down. these days, grand central is an iconic landmark but a train station first got on track 100 years ago today. next time you are here you ought to check that place out. man, it is beautiful. and now you know the news for this friday, february the 1st already. 2013. i'm shepard smith. see you back on monday, which should be a national holiday. >> laura: the o'reilly factor is on. tonight: >> i'm proud of the work we have done to elevate diplomacy and development, to serve the nation we all love. >> and hillary clinton ends her term as secretary of state, "newsweek" proclaims that she is the most powerful woman in american history. really? we'll have a debate. >> we inherited the worst financial crisis and the worst economic crisis since the great depression. >> laura: unemployment on the rise again as the economy continues to falter. who will president obama blame for this latest set back? [bleep] [ applause ] >> and vice president joe biden admits that the new gun laws being proposed might not prevent another newtown. so what's really behind the
is to expand new york city's stop and frisk law to every police precinct in this country with a level of gun violence rises above a certain threshold level. we should have every cop, if they suspect reasonably that a person is carrying a weapon or doing something nefarious or criminal, the cop has the right to pat them down as they are here in new york which has been hugely successful. >> laura: i imagine groups like la ross so -- la larose isa will be against that -- most of the killings in places like chicago, for instance, they take place with handguns. not just the 9-millimeter with a 15 bullets in the magazine type deal, but 38 specials. niece aren't guns that will r. going to be banned. the idea of banning a 15. .6% killings committed with that type of assault weapon. that is silly. is it a concession by the white house that they know they are not going to get anything like that through. >> it might be a concession by the white house to what is possible. because they know they are not going to get the assault weapons through. but you mentioned chicago. compare chicago with new york, ne
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 64 (some duplicates have been removed)